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Mershon Center for International Security Studies

Mershon Center for International Security Studies

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Institute for Korean Studies Lecture Series
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Taedong Lee
Translocal Relations of Climate Change in East Asia
Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Mershon Center for International Security Studies
1501 Neil Avenue, Room 120
Columbus, Ohio 43201

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Taedong LeeTaedong Lee is associate professor at the Department of Political Science and International Relations in Yonsei University, Seoul. His areas of research include global and sub-national environmental politics and policy, NGO politics, international political economy and social network analysis. Professor Lee recently published his monograph, Global Cities and Climate Change: Translocal Relations of Environmental Governance (Routledge, 2015). His articles have appeared in journals including Policy Sciences, Voluntas, Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Review of Policy Research, Journal of Cleaner Production, Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis, Policy Studies Journal, Energy Policy, Global Environmental Politics and other Korean and international peer-reviewed journals.

Abstract

Why do local governments become actively engaged in the issue of global climate change? How do global factors influence local governments’ choices, policies, and interactions? These questions are puzzling in that local governments have been regarded as public service providers in the domestic arena; and studies on cities and climate change have primarily focused on domestic drivers to explain local governments’ climate change policies. In this talk, I discuss translocal relations of cities that have made an international effort to collectively tackle climate change. Compared to state-centric terms, inter-national or trans-national relations, trans-local relations look at policies, politics, and interactions of local governments in the globalized world. Using the framework of translocal relations, I argue that the level of global cityness and local political attributes are primary driving factors for local governments’ engagement in global climate governance in Asia as well as around the world.

Free and open to the public.

This event made possible in part by Ohio Wesleyan University, the Institute for Chinese Studies, the Institute for Japanese Studies, the Institute for Korean Studies and a U.S. Department of Education Title VI grant to The Ohio State University East Asian Studies Center.

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