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Kruzel Lecture

Strobe Talbott

"Election of the Century: The American Presidency and the World"

Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2007
Noon
Mershon Center for International Security Studies
1501 Neil Ave., Columbus, OH 43201

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Strobe Talbott is president of the Brookings Institution, the nation’s oldest think tank devoted to public service through research and education in the social sciences, particularly economics, government, and foreign policy.  Talbott became its president in 2002 after a career in journalism, government and academe.

His immediate previous post was founding director of the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization. He also served in the State Department from 1993 to 2001, first as Ambassador-at-Large and Special Adviser to the Secretary of State for the new independent states of the former Soviet Union, then as Deputy Secretary of State for seven years.

Talbott entered government after 21 years with Time magazine. As a reporter, he covered Eastern Europe, the State Department and the White House, then was Washington bureau chief, editor-at-large and foreign affairs columnist. His books include Engaging India: Diplomacy, Democracy and the Bomb, The Russia Hand, At the Highest Levels (with Michael Beschloss), The Master of the Game, Reagan and Gorbachev (with Michael Mandelbaum), Deadly Gambits, Reagan and the Russians, Endgame, and Khrushchev Remembers: The Last Testament.

He has also written for Foreign Affairs, The New Yorker, Foreign Policy, International Security, The Economist, The Financial Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post and Slate.

Born in Dayton, Ohio, Talbott was educated at Hotchkiss, Yale (B.A., 1968, M.A. Hon., 1976) and Oxford (M.Litt., 1971). He has honorary doctorates from the Monterrey Institute, Trinity College, Georgetown University and Fairfield University, and he has been awarded state orders by the presidents of Estonia, Germany, Lithuania, Poland, and the king of Sweden.

The Kruzel Lecture is given at the Mershon Center each year in honor of Joseph J. Kruzel, an Ohio State faculty member in Political Science who served in the U.S. Air Force as well as other posts in the federal government. Kruzel was killed in Sarajevo, Bosnia, while serving as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for European and NATO Affairs.

William Perry

Joseph J. Kruzel Memorial Lecture

Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2006
Noon
Mershon Center for International Security Studies
1501 Neil Ave., Columbus, OH 43201

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William Perry is the Michael and Barbara Berberian Professor at Stanford University, with a joint appointment at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the School of Engineering. He serves as co-director of the Preventive Defense Project, a research collaboration of Stanford and Harvard universities.

Perry was the 19th U.S. Secretary of Defense, serving from February 1994 to January 1997. He previously served as Deputy Secretary of Defense (1993-94) and as Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering (1977-81). Perry is on the board of directors of several high-tech companies and is chairman of Global Technology Partners.

Among other publications, Perry is co-author of To the Brink of Peace: New Challenges in Inter-Korean Economic Cooperation and Integration (with Henry S. Rowen, Bradley Babson, Nicholas Eberstadt, Peter Hayes, Jeong-Woo Kil, Won Bae Kim, Lawrence J. Lau, and Kiseok Lee; Shorenstein APARC, 2001), and Preventive Defense: A New Security Strategy for America (with Ashton B. Carter; Brookings, 1999).

Perry has received numerous awards, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1997), the Department of Defense Distinguished Service Medal (1980 and 1981), and Outstanding Civilian Service Medals from the Army (1962 and 1997), the Air Force (1997), the Navy (1997), the Defense Intelligence Agency (1977 and 1997), NASA (1981) and the Coast Guard (1997). He received the American Electronic Association's Medal of Achievement (1980), the Eisenhower Award (1996), the Marshall Award (1997), the Forrestal Medal (1994), and the Henry Stimson Medal (1994). The National Academy of Engineering selected him for the Arthur Bueche Medal in 1996. He has received awards from the enlisted personnel of the Army, Navy, and the Air Force. He has received decorations from the governments of Albania, Bahrain, France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Korea, Poland, Slovenia, Ukraine, and the United Kingdom.

Perry has a B.S. and M.S. from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from Penn State, all in mathematics.

Joseph Nye

"The Powers to Lead"

Wednesday, February 11, 2009
Noon
Mershon Center for International Security Studies
1501 Neil Ave., Columbus, OH 43201

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Joseph Nye is University Distinguished Service Professor and Sultan of Oman Professor of International Relations at Harvard University.  He is also the former Dean of the John F. Kennedy School of Government.

Nye has worked in three government agencies.  He served as Deputy to the Under Secretary of State for Security Assistance, Science and Technology, from 1977 to 1979.  He held the position of chairman of the National Intelligence Council, which coordinates intelligence estimates for the President, from 1993 to 1994.  He then served as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs, from 1994 to 1995.

Nye is author of numerous books and more than 150 articles in professional journals.  His most recent publication is The Powers to Lead (Oxford University Press, 2008). In this book, Nye discusses the nature of leadership and how it has been transformed by the information revolution.  He also explores his theory of soft power, a leadership approach that seeks to attract, inspire, and persuade rather than dictate.

Other publications by Nye include The Power Game: A Washington Novel (PublicAffairs, 2004), Soft Power: The Means to Success in World Politics (PublicAffairs, 2004), and an anthology, Power in the Global Information Age (Routledge, 2004).

Nye has published policy articles in The New York Times, The Washington Post, International Herald Tribune, The Wall Street Journal, and Financial Times. He is also a member of the editorial boards of Foreign Policy and International Security magazines. 

He has appeared on programs such as ABC's Nightline and Good Morning America, CNN's Larry King Live, CBS's Evening News, and The PBS News Hour with Jim Lehrer, as well as Australian, British, French, Swiss, Japanese, and Korean television.

Nye is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Academy of Diplomacy, a director of the International Institute for Strategic Studies, a member of the advisory committee of the Institute of International Economics, and the American representative on the United Nations Advisory Committee on Disarmament Affairs.

In addition to his research and teaching at Harvard, Nye also has taught for brief periods in Geneva, Ottawa, and London.  He has lived for extended periods in Europe, East Africa, Central America, and traveled to more than 90 countries.

The Joseph J. Kruzel Lecture is given at the Mershon Center each year in honor of Joseph J. Kruzel, an Ohio State faculty member in Political Science who served in the U.S. Air Force as well as other posts in the federal government. Kruzel was killed in Sarajevo, Bosnia, while serving as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for European and NATO Affairs.

Edward Warner Image
"New START Treaty and Beyond"

Tuesday, February 22, 2011
Noon
Mershon Center for International Security Studies
1501 Neil Ave., Columbus, OH 43201

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Edward L. (Ted) Warner III is the Secretary of Defense representative to New START and senior advisor to the USD (policy) for Arms Control and Strategic Stability. He served as a deputy head of the U.S. delegation that successfully concluded the New START Treaty with the Russian Federation in April 2010.  The New START Treaty was ratified by the United States Senate on December 22, 2010.

Prior to his current appointment, Warner was a principal at Booz Allen Hamilton, an international management and technology-consulting firm from 2001 to 2009.  At Booz Allen, Warner oversaw work to support the development of enhanced U.S. military capabilities, with emphasis on the development of joint capabilities, and refinement of the capabilities-based approach to defense. 

Before joining Booz Allen Hamilton, Warner was assistant secretary of defense for strategy and requirements from May 1993 until November 1997, and assistant secretary of defense for strategy and threat reduction from November 1997 until October 2000. In addition, he worked with NATO allies to create processes for cooperative coalition concept development and experimentation in pursuit of greatly enhanced collective military capabilities. Warner was also responsible for Department of Defense policy for countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction; policy issues associated with U.S. nuclear forces, ballistic missile defense, arms control, and cooperative threat reduction; as well as defense relations with Russia and the other newly dndependent states that emerged following the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Warner served in the Air Force for 20 years.  His assignments included head of the Staff Group, Office of the Air Force Chief of Staff; assistant air attaché at the U.S. Embassy, Moscow; analyst of Soviet military affairs with the Central Intelligence Agency; and an assistant professor of political science at the U.S. Air Force Academy.

Warner graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1962 with a degree in marine engineering.  He completed master's and doctoral degrees in politics at Princeton University.  Between 1978 and 1992, Warner taught graduate courses in Soviet and Russian defense and arms control policy at Princeton University, Columbia University, and George Washington University.

Each year the Mershon Center for International Security Studies selects one lecture in honor of Joseph J. Kruzel, an Ohio State faculty member in Political Science who served in the U.S. Air Force as well as other posts in the federal government. Kruzel was killed in Sarajevo, Bosnia, in 1995 while serving as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for European and NATO Affairs.

Co-sponsored by the Columbus Council on World Affairs and the Center for Slavic and East European Studies

Christopher Hill

Joseph J. Kruzel Memorial Lecture

Christopher Hill

"Trends in American Foreign Policy: What the Next Administration Will Face"

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Christopher R. Hill served as the U.S. Ambassador to Iraq from April 2009 until August 2010. He joined the Josef Korbel School of International Studies in September 2010. He is a career member of the Foreign Service whose prior assignment was assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific affairs. He also served as ambassador to the Republic of Korea. On February 14, 2005, he was named as the head of the U.S. delegation to the Six-Party Talks on the North Korean nuclear issue. Previously he has served as U.S. ambassador to Poland (2000-04), ambassador to the Republic of Macedonia (1996-99) and special envoy to Kosovo (1998-99). He also served as special assistant to the president and senior director for southeast European affairs in the National Security Council.

Earlier in his Foreign Service career, Ambassador Hill served tours in Belgrade, Warsaw, Seoul, and Tirana, and on the Department of State's Policy Planning staff and in the department's Operation Center. While on a fellowship with the American Political Science Association he served as staff member for Congressman Stephen Solarz working on Eastern European issues. He also served as the Department of State's senior country officer for Poland. Ambassador Hill received the State Department's Distinguished Service Award for his contributions as a member of the U.S. negotiating team in the Bosnia peace settlement, and was a recipient of the Robert S. Frasure Award for Peace Negotiations for his work on the Kosovo crisis. Prior to joining the Foreign Service, Ambassador Hill served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Cameroon.

Ambassador Hill graduated from Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, with a BA in economics. He received a master's degree from the Naval War College in 1994. He speaks Polish, Serbo-Croatian and Macedonian.

Each year the Mershon Center for International Security Studies selects one lecture in honor of Joseph J. Kruzel, an Ohio State faculty member in Political Science who served in the U.S. Air Force as well as other posts in the federal government. Kruzel was killed in Sarajevo, Bosnia, in 1995 while serving as deputy assistant secretary of defense for European and NATO affairs.

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