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The Ohio State University

Mershon Center for International Security Studies

Philipp RehmAssociate Professor
Political Science
2186a Derby Hall
614.292.8196
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Education
B.A., University of Tübingen (Germany), Political Science and Economics (2000)
M.A., University of Tübingen (Germany), Political Science and Economics (2002)
M.A., Duke University, Political Science (2004)
M.A., University of Oxford, by Resolution (2008)
Ph.D., Duke University, Political Science (2008)

Teaching/Research
Philipp Rehm is assistant professor of political science at The Ohio State University; previous posts include the Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellowship at Nuffield College, Oxford University.

His work is located at the intersection of political economy and political behavior. In particular, he is interested in the causes and consequences of income dynamics (such as income loss, income volatility, and risk exposure). At the micro-level, his research explores how income dynamics shape individual preferences for redistribution, social policies, and parties. At the macro-level, his work analyzes the impact of labor market and income dynamics on polarization, electoral majorities, and coalitions underpinning social policy.

Rehm's book is Risk Inequality and Welfare States. Social Policy Preferences, Development, and Dynamics (Cambridge University Press, 2016).  In 2014 he won the American Political Science Association's Heinz I. Eulau Award for “The Insecure American: Economic Experiences, Financial Worries, and Policy Attitudes,” published in Perspectives on Politics with co-authors Jacob Hacker and Mark Schlesinger.

Rehm is a member of the team that developed the Economic Security Index: www.economicsecurityindex.org

Faculty Links
Curriculum Vitae (pdf)
Department web page
Professional website
High-resolution photo

Media Links
onCampus: Rise in risk inequality helps explain polarized U.S. voters (2011)

Mershon Project
Social Insecurity in Rich Democracies (2012-13)