New Wave Realism IV

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New Wave Realism with a snarling wolf
December 9 - December 10, 2022
9:30AM - 2:30PM
Location
Online Event

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2022-12-09 09:30:00 2022-12-10 14:30:00 New Wave Realism IV Conference Overview This is the fourth iteration of the New-Wave Realism conference. The primary aim of this conference is to help foster a community of young realist scholars, who are exploring these new global and national developments by adopting, modifying, restating, and renewing realist theories and concepts. Realism as a theoretical perspective has dominated the study of international relations for centuries. From the sophists and Thucydides, to Machiavelli and Hobbes, E. H. Carr and Hans Morgenthau, to Kenneth Waltz, Robert Jervis, and John Mearsheimer, realist thinkers have offered lucid and timely analysis of what makes the clock tick in international politics.  After the Cold War, many non-realists in the field were gleefully proclaiming the death of realism, arguing that it was finished as a useful perspective for understanding world politics. Today, realism is making a comeback. With the rise of China, the return of Russia as a geopolitical player, the ascendance of Trump, populism, autocracy, inequality, economic nationalism, and geoeconomics, and the retreat of democracy and liberalism symptomatic of the decline of the United States and its liberal rule-based international order, the world appears to be moving in directions consistent with traditional realist propositions and expectations. It is a time when the United States, like other major powers, must reevaluate its foreign commitments, rethink its military capabilities, and undertake major reforms to compete on the world stage.  This event is free and open to the public.   Event Host  This event is co-sponsored by the Program for the Study of Realist Foreign Policy at the Mershon Center for International Security Studies and The Charles Koch Foundation.  Online Event Mershon Center mershoncenter@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Conference Overview

This is the fourth iteration of the New-Wave Realism conference. The primary aim of this conference is to help foster a community of young realist scholars, who are exploring these new global and national developments by adopting, modifying, restating, and renewing realist theories and concepts. Realism as a theoretical perspective has dominated the study of international relations for centuries. From the sophists and Thucydides, to Machiavelli and Hobbes, E. H. Carr and Hans Morgenthau, to Kenneth Waltz, Robert Jervis, and John Mearsheimer, realist thinkers have offered lucid and timely analysis of what makes the clock tick in international politics.  After the Cold War, many non-realists in the field were gleefully proclaiming the death of realism, arguing that it was finished as a useful perspective for understanding world politics. Today, realism is making a comeback. With the rise of China, the return of Russia as a geopolitical player, the ascendance of Trump, populism, autocracy, inequality, economic nationalism, and geoeconomics, and the retreat of democracy and liberalism symptomatic of the decline of the United States and its liberal rule-based international order, the world appears to be moving in directions consistent with traditional realist propositions and expectations. It is a time when the United States, like other major powers, must reevaluate its foreign commitments, rethink its military capabilities, and undertake major reforms to compete on the world stage. 

This event is free and open to the public.
 

Event Host 

This event is co-sponsored by the Program for the Study of Realist Foreign Policy at the Mershon Center for International Security Studies and The Charles Koch Foundation

Advanced
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9:30a - 9:45a
Randall Schweller: Opening Remarks

9:45a - 11:00a
Siu Hei Wong (Ph.D. student, USC)
"Don't Say I Haven't Warned You: China's Official Rhetoric and Dispute Escalation.”

11:00a - 12:15p 
Christopher Ray (Ph.D. student, Ohio State University)
“Why the Classics Can’t Console: How Misreading of Realist Icons Obscures Their Relevance to an Increasingly Uncertain World.”

12:15p - 1:15p
Lunch

1:15p - 2:30p
Andrew Pace (History Ph.D. student, University of Colorado, Boulder)
“Feeding Freedom, Rationing Death: Federal Propaganda, Censorship, and the Origins of the 'Good War' Myth.”

2:30p - 3:45p
Mayumi Fukushima (Post-doc, Harvard University; Ph.D., MIT)
“Exploitative Friendships: How Opportunistic Junior Allies Exploit or Entrap Their Patron.”

3:45p - 4:00p
Coffee Break

4:00p - 5:15p
Justin Canfil (Post-doc, Harvard University; Ph.D., Columbia University)
“Controlling Tomorrow: Explaining Anticipatory Bans on Emerging Military Technologies.”

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9:00a - 10:15a
Minseon Ku (Ohio State University)
“Summit Diplomacy and the Logic of Performance in World Politics.”

10:15a - 10:30a
Coffee Break

10:30a - 11:45a
Jonathan Schulman (Ph.D. student, Northwestern)
“Selling Restraint: On the Public’s Love-Hate Relationship with the United States’ Role in the World.”

11:45a - 1:00p
Lunch                        

1:00p - 2:15p
Kyuri Park (Post-doc, Stanford University; Ph.D., USC)
“Do Joint Military Exercises Tell Us Anything About East Asian Security? China’s Rise and The Evidence of Hedging.”

2:15p - 2:30p
Randall Schweller: Closing Remarks

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This event is being recorded and may be posted to our YouTube channel. If you choose to participate in discussion, you are presumed to consent to the use of your comments and potentially your image in these recordings. If you do not wish to be recorded, please contact Kyle McCray (mccray.44@osu.edu).

If you require an accommodation such as live captioning or interpretation to participate in this event, please contact Kyle McCray, mccray.44@osu.edu. Requests made two weeks before the event will generally allow us to provide seamless access, but the university will make every effort to meet requests made after this date.

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