Climate Change and U.S. Foreign Policy

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Climate change and USFP event image
October 21, 2021
4:00PM - 5:00PM
Location
Zoom

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2021-10-21 16:00:00 2021-10-21 17:00:00 Climate Change and U.S. Foreign Policy Please join Professor Alex Thompson for a discussion of climate change and U.S. foreign policy. Dr. Thompson will discuss the recent U.N. climate report and examine the larger consequences of climate change for U.S. foreign policy. Zoom Mershon Center mershoncenter@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Please join Professor Alex Thompson for a discussion of climate change and U.S. foreign policy. Dr. Thompson will discuss the recent U.N. climate report and examine the larger consequences of climate change for U.S. foreign policy.

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This event is being recorded and may be posted to our YouTube channel. If you choose to participate in discussion, you are presumed to consent to the use of your comments and potentially your image in these recordings. If you do not wish to be recorded, please contact Kelly Whitaker (whitaker.285@osu.edu).

If you require an accommodation such as live captioning or interpretation to participate in this event, please contact Kyle McCray, mccray.44@osu.edu. Requests made two weeks before the event will generally allow us to provide seamless access, but the university will make every effort to meet requests made after this date.

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Speaker

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Alexander Thompson

Alexander Thompson is professor of political science. His research and teaching interests are in the area of international relations, with an emphasis on the politics of international organizations and law. 

Thompson's book, Channels of Power: The UN Security Council and U.S. Statecraft in Iraq (Cornell University Press, 2009), explores why the United States sometimes channels its foreign policies through international organizations and other times acts alone.  Channels of Power has won two awards, the International Studies Association’s Chadwick Alger Prize and the J. David Singer Book Award from ISA-Midwest.

Most of Thompson's research addresses the question of why states create and how they design institutions at the international level.  Recent and ongoing projects focus on the evolution of the global climate regime, the negotiation and ratification of international investment agreements, legalization in the world trade, the politics of multilateral weapons inspections, the determinants of international organization performance, and the enforcement of international law. He also writes and speaks on the question of unilateralism versus multilateralism in U.S. foreign policy. 

His articles have appeared in various journals, including International Organization, International Studies Quarterly, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Journal of Legal Studies, European Journal of International Relations, Review of International Organizations, Climatic Change, International Theory, and Policy Studies Journal. His has been associate editor of Security Studies since 2015.

Thompson enjoys teaching and has been honored with the Political Science Department’s Outstanding Teaching Award (2011) and as a finalist for the College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Teaching Award (2005).  Among his administrative duties, he served as his department's director of graduate studies and co-directs the Globalization Workshop with Sarah Brooks at the Mershon Center. 

 

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Event Host

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The American Foreign and Military Policy research cluster is an initiative of the Mershon Center for International Security Studies at The Ohio State University. The cluster focuses on the study of US foreign relations, US defense policy, and international relations, diplomacy, and war as they affect US foreign policy and military affairs in contemporary and historical contexts. The cluster examines these elements of power from both American and foreign viewpoints in order to understand both the domestic drivers of policy and the impact of other nations on it. The cluster examines foreign and military affairs holistically, along with all elements of power – diplomatic, economic, military, informational, financial, intelligence, cultural, and legal – that have an impact on them.