The State and Bureaucracies in Post-Conflict Societies

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Heat map showing where violence occurs
September 25, 2020
12:00PM - 1:30PM
Location
Zoom

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2020-09-25 12:00:00 2020-09-25 13:30:00 The State and Bureaucracies in Post-Conflict Societies Societies that experience civil conflict often have limited state and bureaucratic capacity. What role do state bureaucracies play in the post-conflict period? How does democratic transition influence this role? This discussion focuses on these questions and others related to the state and bureaucracies in post-conflict societies. Zoom Mershon Center mershoncenter@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Societies that experience civil conflict often have limited state and bureaucratic capacity. What role do state bureaucracies play in the post-conflict period? How does democratic transition influence this role? This discussion focuses on these questions and others related to the state and bureaucracies in post-conflict societies.

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If you require an accommodation such as live captioning or interpretation to participate in this event, please contact Kyle McCray, mccray.44@osu.edu. Requests made two weeks before the event will generally allow us to provide seamless access, but the university will make every effort to meet requests made after this date.

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Speaker

 

headshot of Jan Pierskalla

Jan Pierskalla (Ph.D., Duke University, 2012) is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science. His primary field of research is comparative politics. He is especially interested in the political economy of development and political violence. He has a regional interest in Southeast Asia. His work has been published in the American Political Science Review, the Journal of Conflict Resolution and Political Geography.

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Host

The Mershon Center's Recovering from Violence research cluster seeks to contribute to research and practice geared toward addressing social, political, and economic challenges in the aftermath of violence. We engage with conflict stabilization, transitional justice, human rights, development, collective memory, displacement, psychosocial wellbeing, peacebuilding, and reconciliation — guided by our firm belief that the impacts of violence are multigenerational and interconnected. We conduct this work in collaboration with local stakeholders in communities affected by violence and, as such, continually assess research ethics and best practices for decolonizing scholarship. Our goal is to create a dynamic interdisciplinary forum for sharing knowledge and practices related to the recovery of societies from war and political violence.